Sonoita Creek Roots

Last weekend I met with several other artists from the Tucson Plein Air Painters Society at the Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Nature Preserve.  This a beautiful piece of real estate along Sonoita Creek owned by Nature Conservancy.  It is a real haven for bird watchers.   I was able to block in a nice scene while "off trail" on a sandbar along the creek before being runoff for not "staying on the trail".  The original plan was to paint plein air but I had to go to plan B and limit my on-site work to blocking in and taking photos for later use.  It would be really tough to stay on a trail as there are many walkers.  Here is the result as a 10 x 14-inch acrylic on mat board. 


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 4/19/2010 at 6:03 PM
Tags: , , ,
Categories: Landscapes | Plein Air
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Cochise Stronghold

Last week we hiked at Cochise Stronghold.  It was a gorgeous day with many sites that could serve as a model for a good painting.  This one I was especially taken by as it illustrates why Cochise, the Apache Chief, was able to elude the US Army so long by hiding among the large granite boulders in this area.  The painting is acrylic on watercolor paper and measures 21 x 29 inches. 


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 4/2/2010 at 3:21 PM
Tags:
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (1) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Pusch Ridge

This painting is another result of my trip to Catalina Mountain Park with the Tucson Plein Air Painters Society.  In the afternoon I took off for a hike up Montrose Canyon and spotted this great view of Pusch Ridge.  With the recent rains it just so happens there was water in the wash to make the view even better.  This is a 21 x 29-inch acrylic on watercolor paper painted in the studio.  

 


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 2/11/2010 at 7:05 PM
Tags: ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Catalina Mountain Park

I attended a plein aire paintout with the Tucson Plein Air Painters Society.  I've not been a big fan of plein air painting because the lighting changes so fast.  This time I tried a smaller painting, 10 x 14 inches and it worked OK. This painting was done in about 2 hours using acrylics on mat board.  The rapid drying time requires that I paint very fast and use a misting bottle a lot but otherwise it was an enjoyable experience.  I met several other good folks who are old hands at plein air painting with oils.  Although it's difficult to show much detail while working so fast it's facinating to be able to quickly capture the essence of a scene in such a short time.  I plan to do a lot more of this.   


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 2/10/2010 at 10:04 AM
Tags: , , , ,
Categories: Landscapes | Plein Air
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Sycamore Canyon

Sycamore Canyon provides a delightful oasis in the Sonoran Desert of southern Arizona.  This scene is a lunch stop on a recent hike down the canyon from the Ruby road.  It is acrylic on watercolor paper 21 x 29 inches.  I was especially intrigued by the many irregular cavities in the cliffs composed of Atascosa rhyolite tuff as highlighted in the mid-morning sun.   


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 2/6/2010 at 5:07 PM
Tags: ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Icicle Creek

I was impressed with the way the low angle sun was shining through the clear water in these rapids on Icicle Creek near Leavenworth, Washington.  I took several photos but they failed to show the brilliance of the sun on the water.  The first painting is a quick study to see if I could improve what was displayed in the photos. 

This is a 11 x 14-inch acrylic on watercolor paper created in about 1 hour.  It fails to show the wildness of the water and does not have enough contrast.  In the full scale painting I really want to emphasize the three main places where the sunlight shows through the water, and the turbulent water. 

The sun shining through the pale blue milky glacial meltwater provided an amazing array of colors for this 21 x 29-inch acrylic on watercolor paper.  I darkened the background and removed the distraction of the trees. 

 


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 11/10/2009 at 3:08 PM
Tags: ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Methow River Rocks

A beautiful bright fall day on the Methow River near Winthrop, Washington, provided a very simple but interesting scene for this painting.  The river channel is filled with well-rounded granite cobbles and boulders which make a startling contrast with the clear bluish green water of the river.  This is a 22 x 28-inch watercolor.   


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 9/29/2009 at 6:01 PM
Tags: ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

The Sentinel

This weekend I finally got back to painting after several months layoff.  We recently went to Green Valley, Arizona, and purchased a townhouse in which to escape the wet Seattle winters.  The back yard of the townhouse is a desert wash filled with native plants including many varieties of cactus, and lots of Gambel's quail.  The quail are particularly cute to watch as they are very family oriented.  My latest painting is from a scene in the back yard where the male quail is watching out while the family feeds upon seeds in the wash.  I titled this The Sentinel.  This is a 22 x 28-inch acrylic on canvas board. 

 


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 9/6/2009 at 3:52 PM
Tags: , ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (1) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Mt. Shuksan

Mt. Shuksan, in the Baker National Forest of northwest Washington is one of the most photographed mountains in the US.  Generally the photographer takes it with Picture Lake in the foreground to produce a spectacular reflection.  I chose to use a view from the Chain Lakes Trail about 2 miles to the west.  I was impressed with the interesting shapes of the large rocks in the foreground, especially the large boulder of volcanic breccia that serves as the focal point for the painting.  These boulders and the nearby ridges are composed of recent volcanic rocks from the active Mt. Baker volcano that lies a few miles behind the viewer.  Mt. Shuksan itself is much older consisting of Jurassic (150 million year old) Shuksan greenschist derived from submarine volcanics and sediments.

I took several photographs of the area on a hike a year ago that served as the basis for the painting.  Initially I made a quick watercolor 14 x 21 inches to test how the clouds would work partially obscuring Mt. Shuksan.  I was dissappointed with this (see below) in that it hid too much of the mountain and glaciers. 

 

The final painting, a 24 x 36-inch acrylic on watercolor paper, shows Mt. Shuksan much better.  Here is the final painting.


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 2/16/2009 at 8:08 PM
Tags: ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Sunrise on the Wall

This painting depicts a foggy sunrise at the Jinshanling section of the Great Wall of China.  The Jinshanling section lies between Miyun county of Beijing and Luanping county of Hebei Province, 140 km from Beijing. It is a World Heritage Site and a National Priority Protected Site. It is an important architectural treasure of the Ming Dynasty (1368 –1644 AD).  The Jinsanling Wall is 6.3 miles long and is joined on each end by other sections of the wall.   It has six cols (gates), 68 dilous(towers) of varied form and two FengHuoTai (high watch towers).  The wall is the main body for the whole system. It has a stone base. The wall itself is a brick shell filled with stone and earth. Where the landform is even, the wall is about 15 to 17 feet high. The width at the bottom is about 17 feet.   This section of the Wall has had less restoration than others such as the heavily touristed Badaling section. 

The various sections of the Wall were constructed at different times starting about 220 BC in the Qin Dynasty up through the Ming Dynasty and have differing designs.  The wall was constructed to provide defense from the "barbarians" in Mongolia to the north.  Subsequent to the Ming Dynasty Mongolia became part of China so the Wall no longer was needed.  Bricks from the Wall had been scavanged by peasants to build houses, pig styes and chicken coops before the Chinese government enacted laws to protect it in the 1980s.  You can download the following interesting report that includes numerous photos and an assessment of work needed to restore certain parts of the Jinshanling section at the link below.  

Jinshanling Report2005-08.pdf (5.88 mb)

The painting is acrylic on  1/4-inch masonite and measures 24 x 36 inches.  


Posted by: lknight
Posted on: 1/31/2009 at 4:14 PM
Tags: , ,
Categories: Landscapes
Actions: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Post Information: Permalink | Comments (3) | Post RSSRSS comment feed